About me . . .

I am a retired naval officer and a Baptist ladies’ Sunday school teacher.

I am a renaissance woman and a technogeek.

I am a world traveler and a homebody.  I am married to Noel, from Birmingham, England.  I am mother to Joey, age 20, and budding horticulturist.

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9 Responses to “About me . . .”

  1. the undeniable anglophile August 23, 2013 at 7:03 AM #

    A question to you, Ma’am. Have you read ‘The Da Vinci Code’? And then, a conditional one to follow: If you have, what is your opinion on what is said in the book.

    • Mary Gardner Martin August 24, 2013 at 10:50 PM #

      I have read it. I treated the treatises on the New Testament as the fiction that they are (the entire work is fiction, yes?). In other words, I refused to take seriously the gnostic gospels, since the church fathers (and really all of Christendom) recognized them for the obvious frauds they are from the First Century onward. Is that what you thought I would say?

      • the undeniable anglophile August 25, 2013 at 10:22 AM #

        No, actually, the work isn’t fiction, I’m afraid. It is also true that Jesus was merely a man before Constantine announced a meeting of many of the important people of that time.
        If you read the pages before the novel begins, you’ll see that a large part of it is non-fiction.

      • Mary Gardner Martin August 25, 2013 at 12:36 PM #

        Well, it seems you and I are both persons of faith, since we weren’t there to see how things actually happened. It is merely a question of whose account we believe. Wonder which of us exercises the greater faith? Far as I can see (and believe me, I have heard your views for the last 20 years since “The Passover Plot” got a wide airing), all of Christendom for almost 2000 years held to my view, while the “conspiracy theory” (and Americans love a good conspiracy theory) has grown a bit since the 1960’s. Ya just gotta look at the sides, the various “facts” they present, etc. and decide where you personally come down on the issue.
        Since our eternal destiny may be at stake in what we believe about Jesus, I pray you will decide well.

      • the undeniable anglophile August 25, 2013 at 1:26 PM #

        Well, I honestly don’t believe that Jesus was a god or anything related to one. I think that he was simply a really good person who made a big sacrifice for his people. He was simple, kind and well-minded, but not (according to me) a benevolent, all-powerful and omnipotent being.
        And even if I am wrong, I am quite sure that a place to heaven won’t be taken away from me for mere reasons of faith.

      • Mary Gardner Martin August 25, 2013 at 1:31 PM #

        If the Bible is telling us that belief in Jesus is the one key factor in eternal life, the Bible would have to be either totally evil or totally mistaken to the point of being nonsensical to have gotten that wrong. I think the Bible confronts us with Jesus and with whether we will believe that He is the Saviour of the world or not. You can decide to not believe, but I don’t think you get to rewrite the message of the Bible in doing so. Just say you give more credence to “The Passover Plot” and “The DaVinci Code” than you give to a book that has stood for over 2000 years and has influenced countless lives for good! I believe in being honest. I actually respect that more than revisionist history.

      • the undeniable anglophile August 25, 2013 at 2:28 PM #

        Well, then, supposing I don’t give credence to it on account of the fact that the Bible is quite ancient, then I guess that must mean that we can give more credence to Hindu and Buddhist writings than the Bible, as it is commonly considered that the Buddha walked the Earth 2700 years ago, and Rama and Krishna, Hindu reincarnations of Vishnu, were claimed to have been kings much before even that. They are both old texts, both have affected Indian and relatedculturesin ways that the Bible cannot dream of having affected Western civilisation. In fact, it is said of one of the Hindu texts that ‘everything that is in the Mahabharatha is present in actual life, and anything that isn’t cannot be found on his earth. I myself am a former Hindu and I’ve studied the aforementioned text well.
        Now, does this mean that we can say that one man defeating a troop of sixty-thousand is likely? No.
        The thing that many humans fail to understand is that:
        A. No religious text has remained unaltered in its entire existence.
        B. Much of what we think to be true must be taken in a symbolical sense.
        C. Political tensions and problems have affected religious texts heavily

      • Mary Gardner Martin August 25, 2013 at 2:54 PM #

        Again, we have both read our sources and choose to believe them (and exclude others we have read) because neither of us was there for the referenced events. All of life is faith, if you think about it. Unless you were an eyewitness, you have to have faith in somebody else’s account. But exchanges like these are interesting, though I doubt either of us changes the other’s world view!

  2. Anne September 10, 2013 at 12:01 AM #

    “…anglophile stated, ‘ Well, I honestly don’t believe that Jesus was a god or anything related to one. I think that he was simply a really good person who made a big sacrifice for his people. He was simple, kind and well-minded, but not (according to me) a benevolent, all-powerful and omnipotent being. And even if I am wrong, I am quite sure that a place to heaven won’t be taken away from me for mere reasons of faith.'”

    If Jesus was not who He claimed to be as recorded in the Bible, then he was anything but “a really good person…simple, kind and well-minded.” He was either a lunatic, a liar, or someone on the level of a poached egg.” I think it was C.S. Lewis who made that point in his book Mere Christianity.

    If Jesus was not the Son of God who died and rose again, then He was a master deceiver, and pathological liar. He cannot be deemed a “good person”.

    I honestly hope that you will sincerely seek to know what is true about Jesus.

    If you doubt the reliability of the New Testament, there is a good little book by F.F. Bruce, “The New Testament Documents: Are They Reliable?”

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